Academic Support Program

Partnerships that engage students and enhance learning

The Academic Support Program helps students learn about themselves as learners, use effective academic strategies, and advocate productively for their education. Combining encouragement with expectations, we provide a variety of services including: Accommodation Plans, Limited-enrollment Classes, SAT/ACT Accommodations, and Individual and Group Academic Support Classes.
The Academic Support Program (ASP) helps New Hampton School students develop an understanding of their singular strengths and differences, which enables them to contribute to the school community and to the world at large.  ASP faculty are mentors who model what they expect students to learn, provide opportunities for guided practice, and encourage student progress and independence.

The overarching goal of the ASP is to help students build learning confidence through skill development and use of strategies.  At New Hampton School Individual, Shared, and Group Academic Support are regularly scheduled classes, in contrast to other schools where "tutoring" may take place once or twice a week, in the evening or after regular classes are over for the day.  Integrating academic support into the student's daily class schedule leads to a high level of student engagement and increases the effectiveness of strategy instruction.

Program Outcomes

As an outcome of their participation in the Academic Support Program, students will have greater awareness of themselves as learners: they will know their strengths, understand their individual learning styles, and use strategies effectively and independently. Students gain confidence as they progress through the ASP and begin taking the risks necessary for substantial learning to take place.

Learn more

List of 5 items.

  • ASP Q&A

    How do you determine if my child should enroll in the Academic Support Program?
    The only requirement for academic support is a need on the part of the student and the family for the transformative potential of a relationship that is structured and focused on each student’s individual learning goals.
    Documentation of an educational disability or history of a learning difference is not required. Testing is used in conjunction with other sources of information about the student’s learning strengths and needs. We never use test scores alone to make a decision regarding a student’s participation in the Academic Support Program (ASP), however, they do provide a good overview of how a student learns.
     
    Which learning differences does ASP help with?
    Specifically, the Academic Support Program works with students who have language-based and executive functioning learning differences. Highly individualized learning plans are devised for documented learning differences and may be used for test-taking accommodations (including PSAT, SAT, ACT, IB, and AP exams) or accommodations in the classroom, house, or athletic setting. In this way, the focus is suited to the student’s needs. Skills addressed for the classroom include reading, writing, mathematics, executive functions, test taking strategies, content mastery and test preparation strategies, self-advocacy, and college planning.
     
    Is ASP “special education?”
    No, ASP is not “special ed.” It involves tailor-made plans and strategies for skill-building in areas of weakness. Many students in ASP take AP, International Baccalaureate or other honors-level courses at NHS.
     
    How does ASP help in the classroom?
    All teachers have reviewed copies of any accommodation plan for students in their classes. They differentiate their instruction for all different types of learners, so those that absorb information in different ways can still be successful. Some teachers have previously been a part of the Academic Support Program, so they are versed in how to best accommodate all types of learning. After learning the skills that will lead them to success in a classroom, a student is better prepared to take on challenges in current and future courses, in college and beyond.
     
    Will my child be ready for college?
    As an outcome of their participation in the Academic Support Program, students will have greater awareness of themselves as learners: they will know their strengths, understand their individual learning styles, and use strategies effectively and independently. Students gain confidence as they progress through ASP and begin taking the risks necessary for substantial learning to take place. The goal of the Academic Support Program is to have students “graduate” over their time at New Hampton and become autonomous in their learning. They are more prepared for college because they can identify a weakness and overcome it or ask for help.
     
    How does the ASP at NHS compare to other independent schools?
    Support classes are regularly scheduled classes, in contrast to other schools where “tutoring” may take place once or twice a week, in the evening or after regular classes are over for the day. Integrating academic support into the student’s daily class schedule leads to a high level of student engagement and increases the effectiveness of strategy instruction. Far from limiting a student’s ability to take electives, ASP supports many students as they excel in higher-level courses.
     
    How many students are in the program at NHS?
    Roughly 25% of students at New Hampton School participate in either Group or Individual Support classes.
     
    Does ASP count for credit? How is it graded?
    ASP courses are offered as part of a student’s schedule, so it counts for credit (one elective credit per year) and appears on the transcript. It is graded as pass/fail and instructors write comments and give effort marks as in other academic classes.
     
    How do you use technology/iPad in ASP?
    With full iPad classroom use across all academic areas, ASP serves to support the greater faculty technology effort. Students can photograph the whiteboard with their iPads, and rewrite and organize the notes in tutorial. ASP also promotes aural learning. Students may use Dragon Dictation for note taking or receive assistance in finding 
    the right source for an audio text best suited for them. The math department is piloting a smart pen program on the iPad in which the teacher records a video of the steps required to solve a problem. The students can then work through the problem with the teacher’s narration.
     
    How much training do instructors in the Academic Support Program have?
    Teachers participate in professional development workshops throughout the year (language-based learning differences, how anxiety effects learning, etc). They have backgrounds in special education, teaching, or other areas of education.
     
    What can I expect from an instructor?
    ASP instructors centralize communication with parents and student’s teachers regarding assignments, assessments, grades, and accommodation plans. The instructors also teach skills like organization, time management, and test-taking strategies.
     
    Do you have different instructors for different subject areas?
    While some instructors have a specialized background in a certain subject, the goal of ASP is really to build skills that will allow the student to be successful in all areas. Instructors can help with content to a certain extent, but they will likely encourage students to seek out a teacher from a certain subject area if they need help. If a student needs specialized help in math, world language, etc., NHS has a relationship with an outside tutorial program that can meet with students during their free blocks or after school for an additional fee.
     
    What are some other services the Learning Center offers if my child does not need ASP but would like support in some areas (test-taking, writing, SAT/ACT prep)?
    ASP also offers Supported Study, which is a great option for students who need help only during a certain time of year or every once in a while. During free blocks, the instructors in ASP may staff the Learning Center for students in Supported Study that need extra support in their classes. The Academic Office, a student’s advisor, or a parent may put a student in this program because of unsatisfactory performance, or a student may self-select to be in the program for as long as they feel it is needed. There is no additional fee.
     
    If my child needs extra help in one subject, how can they be supported?
    The goal of the Academic Support Program is to build skills that will enable a student to be successful in all subject content areas. If a student needs help in one particular area, teaching faculty at New Hampton School are available to students for extra help during office hours (which occurs twice per week), study hall at night in the houses, during free blocks, or by arranging a time to meet and review material. For more intensive review, New Hampton School can also pair students with tutors from Knower Academics, a third-party tutorial agency that links students with a tutor during their free block or after school.
     
    Can my child take IB or honors courses and still participate in ASP?
    Yes. Many of our IB and honors students benefit from long-term project management help while balancing immediate smaller tasks and assignments. ASP works in conjunction with the academic schedule of the School, not as a separate course of study.
     
    What are some colleges that ASP students have recently attended?
    The class of 2015 was accepted to over thirty-two colleges and universities including American University, Denison University, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Northeastern University, Skidmore College, St. Lawrence University, Trinity College, and Union College.

    What are the different instructor:student levels of ASP?
    Individual  1:1
    Shared      1:2
    Group*      1:3 or 1:4 

    *Group Support is offered to juniors, seniors, and postgraduates who have previously mastered basic academic strategies. 
    Testimonials
     
    “The academic support program does a wonderful job helping students understand how they learn. The ASP and classroom teachers work together with students in order to help them develop the skills they need to find success in different subjects. They instill important concepts like self advocacy and specific organization skills that students can take with them outside of NHS.”
    -Maura Veilleux, Science Instructor, New Hampton School
     
    “The faculty in ASP are instrumental to teaching students organization and accountability. During longer projects they assist students in ordering their research and help them develop their ideas while providing guidance in focusing their points. The faculty in ASP really care about the students and it shows in their communication with parents and teachers.”
    -Meredith C. Brown, History Instructor, New Hampton School
  • Requirements for Participating in Academic Support Programs

    In most cases the requirements for participation in the different classes and services offered to students by the Academic Support Program center around the need for up to date, comprehensive evaluations. Not all evaluations, even costly evaluations performed by hospitals or special clinics, necessarily include all of the required tests. If you are in the process of arranging an updated evaluation, please pay particular attention to the requirements listed here.
  • Individual, Shared, and Group Academic Support

    Roughly 20 percent of NHS students participate in Individual or Group Academic Support classes, where they develop personalized strategies for becoming self-advocating, lifelong learners in the context of an academic mentoring relationship with a faculty member. In these classes, academic course content is the authentic and practical starting point for learning and practicing academic strategies.

    The only requirement for participating in Individual Academic Support class is a felt need on the part of the student and the family for the transformative potential of a one to one relationship that is structured and focused on each student’s individual learning goals: documentation of an educational disability or history of a learning differences is not required.

    Group Academic Support is offered to juniors, seniors, and postgraduate students who have previously mastered basic academic strategies.

    Individual Academic Support is $10,900 per year.
    Shared Academic Support is $7,900 per year.
    Group Academic Support is $5,900 per year.
  • Accommodation Plans

    For students with documented learning differences requiring accommodations in the classroom, dorm, or athletic setting, we create accommodation plans, and consult with coaches, dorm parents, and teachers to be sure the accommodations are effectively implemented.

    The director of the Academic Support Program decides whether to grant accommodations, and makes decisions about the accommodations that will be offered at NHS. In order to receive an Accommodation Plan, including accommodations such as a foreign language waiver and extended time on tests and exams, students must have a diagnosed learning difference documented by a comprehensive psycho-educational evaluation made within two years of enrollment. If the student had an IEP, a 504 plan, or other written educational plan listing accommodations in a previous school, it is helpful if that plan is submitted. However, without a comprehensive psycho-educational evaluation, an IEP or other educational plan is not sufficient for the student to receive an accommodation plan at NHS. PPPThe comprehensive psycho-educational evaluation must include the following:

    (1) A standardized, individually administered assessment of cognitive ability, such as the Wechsler Intelligence test for Children, IV edition (WISC-IV), or for students over the age of 16, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, III edition (WAIS-III).

    (2) A standardized individually administered test of academic achievement, such as the WJ-III or the WIAT-2. The Gray Oral Reading Test, the Key Math Test, and other similar tests that do not broadly assess all areas of academic achievement, are not acceptable.

    (3) The written report of the evaluation must list the name of the learning difference or differences, and must explain using specific terms, how the learning difference impacts the student’s functioning in school.

    (4) Any other assessments that are needed to support the recommendation of accommodations for emotional and behavioral issues, such as neuropsychological tests, clinical psychological diagnostic tests, or assessments for ADHD.(5) A list of the accommodations that are necessary due to the learning differences found through the testing process.
  • PSAT/SAT/ACT Accommodations

    For sophomores we facilitate the completion of registration and application materials needed by students who are eligible to receive accommodations on the PSAT, SAT, or ACT. Juniors with existing test accomodations can transfer their SSD# to New Hampton School. The Director of Academic Support will work closely with you to help make this happen.

    In order to receive accommodations on the SAT or ACT, students must register with the appropriate organization (College Board for the PSAT and SAT, or ACT for the ACT). The Academic Support Program assists students and their families in this process, including advising students and their families of the various deadlines and options for each type of test, and providing documentation as needed to support the requested accommodations. All decisions regarding accommodations are made by the testing agency.

    Please Note: Detailed information regarding the required documentation is available on the following Web sites:
    Families are strongly encouraged to study this information carefully in advance of obtaining updated evaluations.

Contact the Director

List of 1 members.

  • Jennifer McMahon 

    Academic Support Program Director
    603-677-3540
    Read

Did you know?

A study by The American Psychological Society found that students who use active learning strategies like the ones we teach in ASP perform significantly better on exams than students who do not use these strategies.

ASP & IB

In the December 2014 - January 2015 issue of Insightspublished by The Independent Educational Consultants Association, New Hampton School Interim Director of Enrollment Management Will McCulloch covers the harmony between the International Baccalaureate Programme and the School's Academic Support Program.

FAQs

List of 6 frequently asked questions.

  • What skills are addressed in individual and group academic support classes?

    The focus is individualized according to the student's needs. Skills addressed include reading, writing, mathematics, executive functions, test taking strategies, content mastery and test preparation strategies, self-advocacy, and college planning.
  • How often do academic support classes meet?

    Group and Individual academic support classes meet three to four times per week during the academic day. This is in contrast to other schools where "tutoring" may take place once or twice a week, in the evening, or after regular classes are over for the day. When academic support is a regular part of the student’s daily class schedule, the result is a high level of student engagement and increased effectiveness of strategy instruction.
  • Are grades given for individual and group academic support classes?

    Yes. Students earn a grade of Pass or Fail.  A passing grade results in an elective credit towards graduation.
  • Are there fees for individual and group academic support classes?

    Yes. Individual Academic Support is $10,900 per year, Shared Tutorial is $7,900 per year, and Group Tutorial is $5,900 per year.

  • How do you use testing?

    Testing is used in conjunction with other sources of information about a student’s learning strengths and needs. We never use test scores alone to make any decision regarding a student’s participation in the Academic Support Program.

    However, testing does provide us with a good overview of how a student learns. For example, cognitive testing lets us know if a student is stronger in the analytic, sequential processing of verbal information, or whether their strength is in the simultaneous processing of visual-spatial information. Cognitive testing also gives us important clues as to the speed of processing, and helps us predict how well the student can use short term working memory as a learning tool, or whether the student will need accommodations to help compensate for weaknesses in these areas.

    Academic achievement testing is helpful because it documents the student’s actual mastery of various academic skills. It is very important for us to see that a student who is above average in reading and written language is several years below grade level in mathematics skills. It is important to see if the student has mastered basic “math facts” but is not able to easily understand abstract mathematical concepts. That student will have very different learning need than a student with the opposite profile: poor math fact mastery, but good grasp of math concepts.

    Other testing is helpful in rounding out our picture of the student’s learning needs. Is the student anxious? Depressed? These psychological conditions are often accompanied by losses in concentration, task persistence, and motivation. It is important to understand what is causing a student to appear uninterested or inattentive in class.
  • May students transition out of the Academic Support Program?

    Yes, they may. As students internalize learning techniques and strategies, they automatically apply them to new learning situations. Their standing as independent learners improves as they build and use their learning "tool kits." They may take steps to independence by transitioning from Individual Academic Support to Group Academic Support in their junior or senior year, or they may end services altogether at the close of any given the academic year.
An independent, college preparatory school for boarding and day students, grades 9-12 and postgraduate.
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New Hampton School
70 Main St., New Hampton, NH, 03256 (603)-677-3400
admission@newhampton.org